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Kwolatee Kennels

Kwolatee Kennels

About English Cocker Spaniels

There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face. ~ Ben Williams


Origin


The English Cocker Spaniel is one of the oldest spaniels known. Originally known as a general spaniel-type dog that was imported into England centuries ago, the dogs were divided into seven different spaniel breeds: the English Springer, the Cocker Spaniel, the Clumber, the Sussex, the Welsh Springer, the Field, and the Irish Water. The Cocker and Springer Spaniels developed together, with only size differentiating them until 1892, when the Kennel Club of England recognized them as separate breeds. In 1946 the American and Canadian Kennel Clubs recognized the English Cocker Spaniel as a separate breed from the American Cocker Spaniel.


The Cocker Spaniel is a hunting-gun dog able to work in difficult terrain in both wet and dry land.  Excellent at flushing and retrieving game with a gentle mouth. It listens to commands well.


The name "Cocker" comes from the woodcock, a game bird the dogs were known for flushing. Some of the English Cocker Spaniel’s talents are hunting, tracking, retrieving, watchdog, agility and competitive obedience.


Temperament


Cockers are compassionate, determined, kind, intelligent, athletic, alert and resilient and make great family pets. The breed does not like being alone and will bond strongly to an individual person in a family, usually the one who feeds it.


Known for optimism, intelligence and adaptability, the breed is extremely loyal and affectionate. The English Cocker Spaniel has a cheerful nature.


They rank 18th in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, being of excellent working/obedience intelligence. Due to the breed's happy disposition and continuously wagging tail, it has been given the nickname "merry cocker". They can also be dominant but loyal to their companion. With a good level of socialisation at an early age, Cocker Spaniels can get well along with people, children, other dogs and other pets. This breed seems to have a perpetually wagging tail and prefers to be around people; it is not best suited to the backyard alone. Cockers can be easily stressed by loud noises and by rough treatment or handling. When trained with a soft hand and with many rewards, the Cocker Spaniel will be an obedient and loving companion with a happy, cheerful nature.


They are average barkers, and are willing and happy to listen to their owners. A superior companion dog.


Generally an outgoing breed, taking to strangers easily, some individuals can be reserved without enough socialization. This breed may do well with family cats, depending on the personality of both the cat and the dog.


Cockers are sensitive to the tone of one’s voice and will not listen if they sense they are stronger-minded than their owner, however they will also not respond well to discipline.


Giving your dog/s consistent structure, calm, stern authority, with rules made clear and walks, will help make your dog/pup a much happier pet.


For More Information:


Dog Breed Info Centre

Dogs NSW